Friday, January 10, 2014

How Kundalini is Perceived

If you're out there, dealing with Kundalini, how do you explain it to others, to yourself?

Recently, I had the opportunity to test this. I wasn't giving a talk or a presentation on Kundalini; I had been invited to join a community discussion group with five or six other men and I was attending my fifth or sixth session. Discussion usually skirted around cultural and any number of other progressive topics, but it never touched spiritual matters. And I never brought one up.
 
Faith or Science
Prayer or Practice

One day, however, one of the participants — I later discovered he was battling cancer — mentioned  the afterlife question in a way that flowed seamlessly into the existing context. I can't remember word for word what followed, but I did seize the opening to comment on my research into human energy potential and my findings that death was not to be feared and was only a transition into a new state of being. Someone asked me if I could prove it. I cited NDE and Kundalini as examples of consciousness existing outside mind and body. I underlined that mine was an hypothesis, that the research had been done in the laboratory of my own body, but was supported by many similar accounts from all over the globe. Some members continued the discussion; the man who'd started it wanted to hear more. But several others began shouting that Kundalini had no scientific value; it was only a cult.

A cult, a religion, a philosophy, a practice, and an exercise regimen. It's been called all of the above, and probably less flattering names as well, I observed. One man kept shouting it's a cult, it's a cult. I spent two minutes trying to explain that Kundalini was a biological process, that I had no religious affiliation. My experience had begun with breathing exercises, which proceeded to open up hidden energy centers in my body that I could observe and that I have documented in several books.

I stated that the experience was completely unexpected and was not the result of any religious practice. In fact, I practice no religion nor do I hold any position on God.

However, Kundalini does expand consciousness. This effect has nothing to do with religion. It is the by-product of the biological energy Kundalini produces and it resulted in my becoming immersed in an Energy Continuum, not unlike the Unified Field physicists speak of. This experience has inspired me to learn more and to keep an open mind on the subject of higher consciousness and its possible effect on evolution.  

"Cult, cult," he shouted.

It's not a religion or a cult. You can't be "converted" to Kundalini, any more than you can be converted to a heart attack or an orgasm; they just happen. That's the nature of biological processes; they just happen. Some are triggered by external stimuli or practices; others are autonomic.

Needless to say that was the last meeting I attended. What's the point? If a person is so closed-minded he confuses biology with religion, there's little room for dialogue.

So how do you explain Kundalini? How do others react to your explanation? Do we learn anything from these types of encounters?

4 comments:

  1. Regrettable. Wish I was there to provide some support,
    How do I explain Kundalini? I speak about it personally only with people I know who have some knowledge and acceptance of it, and that's very very few in my circle. In conservative christian circles, I find anything to do with "energy" is rejected as heretical and is a very threatening subject; therefore communication is impossible. I believe that's why there is very little on kundalini in christian literature, and what is there is disguised in a different language like "dark night of the soul", "consolations", "spiritual ecstasy", "swooning", "locutions". St. Theresa of Avila experienced all these, but she was also accused by her superiors at the time that all this was the work of evil. The symbols and archetypal images of kundalini are construed with much suspicion and paranoia because they portray something very different in Christianity, for example the serpent.
    How do others react to my explanations? In my very few communications, the reaction is suspicion, followed by caution or warnings. Most of my communications are anomalous.
    Do I learn anything from these types of encounters? I heard it said once, when you are one spiritual step ahead, you can be challenging to your listeners. If you are two spiritual steps ahead, you become threatening. This area, except in very selective cases, regrettably is often too threatening for most. Therefore, we can only respect where people are and communicate at their level of acceptance, and every now and again, challenging. Otherwise, communication ceases.

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  2. I think I've genuinely told four people since that weird bittersweet day. I try not to talk about it now unless it's in an extremely general, non-descriptive kind of way, which is essentially not talking about it, but I do think there are probably moments when it can be useful to touch i.e. genuine seekers out there who may benefit in some mysterious way from hearing the tale of one's awakening.

    From my experiences, the reaction to talking about Kundalini has been largely positive in a sympathetic way, as in they were trying their best to understand but really couldn't accept it, and I don't in any way blame them for that because, really, how does one discuss something that insinuates an answer to the existence of an afterlife let alone a greater consciousness among us? It's just too much for most people without experiencing it so it'll always remain a mystery until then. I know this because before my experience with Kundalini, I was a seeker. I wanted desperately to know what Kundalini was because it seemed like such a big deal in the metaphysical circles. But even after reading about in your book and signing up and taking workshops on Kundalini and practicing Kundalini Yoga, it still made no real sense to me.

    Looking back now, if it weren't for guys like you and Gopi Krishna and the handful of websites that discuss Kundalini, I probably would have thought I was possessed by a demon for at least the first year, and for that I thank you. Now of course it's the greatest blessing, and although sometimes it doesn't feel that way, i know that behind the occasional discomfort is a great and enduring wisdom that I am only beginning to see a glimpse of its glimpse of a glimpse.

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  3. The context of the meetings I attended was to discuss of progressive topics. These were highly educated men. I later found out that two of them had been indoctrinated into fundamentalist Christian religions as children, and, as they grew older, they had rejected all religion. The feelings triggered by this backlash rendered them unable to process simple statements like:

    "Kundalini is a biological process." "It's not a religion or a cult. You can't be 'converted' to Kundalini, no more than you can be converted to a heart attack or an orgasm; they just happen."

    Had it not been for the gentleman suffering from cancer's introducing the subject of life after death, I would never have brought up the issue. That a discussion among educated men devolved so quickly into incoherence was a shock, not because of the closed-mindedness of certain participants, but because of the level of virulence. A shock, but not a surprise.

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  4. This is a very important subject. In the past there was a saying 'those who speak don't know and those who know don't speak" and I think it was because those who 'knew' knew that those who listened wouldn't understand. Hearing does not inevitably lead to understanding. This is why it is not so much the details of experiences which are important to share and not hide from sharing but their transformative results. People are never going to understand the experiences but what is undeniable is the physical, mental and spiritual transformation which arises as a result. So the onus is very much on us who stand up and declare these experiences to be the example of what these experiences make possible, not to get hung up on the experiences themselves.

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